HAMSIHAMSI

The History of Astronomical and Mathematical Sciences in India (HAMSI) Working Group is dedicated to fostering and disseminating research in the history of Indian exact sciences (including astronomy, mathematics, and related subjects), and integrating it into the history of mathematics in general.

About HAMSI


The History of Astronomical and Mathematical Sciences in India (HAMSI) Working Group is dedicated to fostering and disseminating research in the history of Indian exact sciences (including astronomy, mathematics, and related subjects), and integrating it into the history of mathematics in general.   HAMSI is supported by a five-year grant from the Royal Society of New Zealand and is coordinated by its founding members Dr Clemency Montelle (School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Canterbury, New Zealand) and Prof Kim Plofker (Department of Mathematics, Union College, NY, USA).

Core areas of interest  are:
  • the development of computational procedures and numerical tables in Sanskrit mathematics and astronomy in the second millennium, involving a survey and online database of texts, manuscripts, parameters, algorithms and practitioners from Bhaskara II to the effective end of the sastra in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
  • Developments in stylistic and technical formats in jyotisa texts, including the rise of the kosthaka/sarani genre and literary expectations in jyotisa writing
  • the works of Nityananda and Balabhadra in the context of intellectual exchanges at the Mughal court
  • Prosopographical and bibliographic documentation: identification of relationships among texts and among their authors, commentators and scribes
  • Issues in the justification of scientific knowledge, from theory and practice of empirical observation to the role of mathematical proof to the authority of "divine siddhantas" to the importance of various pramanas
  • Changing relationships between jyotisa and other areas of Sanskrit literature, e.g., darsanas, ayurveda, kavya, itihasa
  • Cross-cultural connections: language, translation, transmission
University of Canterbury Chennai Mathematical Institute Royal Society NZ